Newsletter No 44

20 August 2010

Hi there

 I intend importing K&N's within the next few days.
So if you need something weird and wonderful, please advise me.
 

If I may bounce an idea of you, would you buy the following system for your vehicle:

This should fit the New Toyota 4L Hilux to get a Power Boost with K&N Performance Air Intake System

It was developed for the 2007 Toyota FJ Cruiser, which was designed to look similar to Toyota's 1960s Land Cruisers. 

The midsize SUV seats five, has two main doors and two rear-hinged access doors.

K&N Engineering's 77-9030KP
K&N Engineering's 77-9030KP
77-9030KP Installed
77-9030KP Installed
K&N Engineering has developed a 77 Series High-Flow Air Intake System (77-9030KP) with a bright finish for the 2007 Toyota FJ Cruiser V6 4.0 liter engine. K&N dynamometer tests show a horsepower gain of 8.17 @ 4785 rpm.

Click on image to see full sized PDF version
Click on image to see full sized PDF version
"The factory air box is mounted to the intake manifold," said K&N Performance Kit Manager Bert Heck. "We gained horsepower by removing the factory intake system and replacing it with our smoother, less restrictive air intake. We also put in an oversized cone shaped K&N Air Filter (RF-1048) which allows for more dirt retention before cleaning is required. This is great for weekend warriors who love to go on the dirty and dusty back roads. The heat shield on 77-9030KP is secured using existing mounting points near the power steering reservoir and on the inner fender. "

The K&N Air Intake System is free-flowing which results in more power. "The mass air sensor is installed in the K&N Intake tube with the provided hardware," said Heck. "The placement of the mass air sensor was an important part of gaining horsepower on this kit."

The factory engine cover fits in its original location once the K&N Intake System is in place. It takes less than 90 minutes to install most K&N air intakes with common tools. K&N air intakes come with the famous K&N Million Mile Limited Warranty.

The MSRP is 449 which equals 3370 in SA currency.
Of course we do stock the stock replacement filter @ 427.62 retail.
Find K&N products for your vehicle using the K&N application search.


Add Power to 1.4 and 1.6 Liter Toyota Corolla with K&N Typhoon Cold Air Intake System

The Toyota Corolla is one of the best selling cars in the world. It is manufactured in Japan, the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Malaysia, China, Taiwan, Pakistan, South Africa, Brazil, Turkey, India and Venezuela.

K&N's 69-8754TR Typhoon Air Intake System
K&N's 69-8754TR Typhoon Air Intake System
K&N Engineering, Inc. has released a new 69-Series Typhoon Air Intake System (69-8754TR) in powder coated red for the 2002 through 2007 Toyota Corolla 1.4 and 1.6 liter engines. Designers chose the color red because it is a very popular color for this model in Europe.

The Typhoon Air Intake Systems offer the best possible horsepower with a more stylish appearance. K&N Engineering's high flow technology is applied to a large conical open element K&N Air Filter (RU-4960). This provides more surface area for huge increases in airflow and power you can feel. The Mass Airflow sensor is integrated into the tube through the vent for a nicer look, said K&N Product Development Technician Patrick Jacobs.

The design of the Corolla played a major role in the making of this K&N Cold Air Intake System. The replacement K&N Air Filter is placed on top of the engine, in place of the original air box. The aluminum tube fits directly onto the throttle body. The K&N Filtercharger Air Filter is installed onto the other end of the tube where it can provide the engine a virtually free flow of air for more power.

There is a thorough development procedure for all K&N 69-Series Typhoon Air Intakes which requires the use of multiple test vehicles. The Toyota Corolla is one of the best selling cars in Europe and finding donor vehicles was not a problem.

Applications are as follows:

2007 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.6L L4 F/I
2007 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.4L L4 F/I
2006 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.6L L4 F/I
2006 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.4L L4 F/I
2005 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.6L L4 F/I
2005 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.4L L4 F/I
2004 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.6L L4 F/I
2004 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.4L L4 F/I
2003 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.6L L4 F/I
2003 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.4L L4 F/I
2002 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.6L L4 F/I
2002 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.4L L4 F/I

The MSRP is 323.07 = 2425 Rands
Find K&N products for your vehicle using the K&N application search.

Tuning Tips: Sequence

I would just like to comment on the issue of tuning sequence. Here are Klaus thoughts (extracted from thread of his postings):

The usual tuning sequence is to tune AFR first. Then tune timing. Then modify AFR in specific areas to possibly get a little more torque in specific cells. Then adjust timing in those areas again to MBT.

For example, some combustion chambers like to produce max torque at 13.x AFR at some load number. But let's say you can get there only with race gas. Playing around with the AFRs and timing at that area you get the best compromise between torque and octane when running pump gas. In the higher RPM areas, where you have lower VE, it might be possible to lean out more to the optimum for the chamber as the octane requirements change with rising RPM as well, depending on the chamber design. This of course assumes you are not cooling system limited.

Start the cam timing with conservative AFR and ignition timing. Changing cam timing changes the VE curve of the engine. AFR and ignition tuning depend on that. Always change the most independent variable first. Best cam timing depends on your goals and the intake and exhaust system of the engine. This changes VE.

Fuel flow is relative to VE and load.

So adjust AFR next. Ign. timing depends on VE, AFR and load. So do that last.

Then go back and forth to fine-tune AFR and ign. timing. With a turbo SOHC engine, adjustable cam gears are not needed unless you are experimenting with different cams. Cam timing changes how the engine breathes, and can maximize that breathing by taking advantage of natural resonances in the intake and exhaust. This is not applicable on a turbo. With compressed air (turbo) you can make a corpse breathe. There is some advantage with adjustable cams on a DOHC for a turbo.

Tune the cams (without turbo) as you would for a truck: low RPM torque peak. This reduces "apparent" turbo lag and helps initial spooling. With cam timing changes on n/a (not electronically controllable) you can have one of three mutually exclusive goals:

1. Max Power (move torque peak up and maximize it at higher rpm's)

2. Max torque at low end (low rpm torque peak for towing)

3. Economy (leave intake open partially into compression stroke, or open earlier during exhaust stroke. Makes compression stroke essentially shorter than expansion and rises efficiency, but costs power and torque).

Of course your intake and exhaust system and valve/port sizes determine what's achievable. A truck intake/exhaust won't make a truck engine into a high-rev race engine with only cam changes.

Cam tuning procedure:

Set a rich AFR of say 11 or 10.5 across the WOT row and keep low ign. advance.
With a speed density or alpha-n system you log AFR, RPM and TPS. Make WOT acceleration runs in high gear (at least 10 secs for a sweep, using brake as load if needed to stay at legal speeds).

Select the WOT part of the run only and look in your Log at an x-y plot of AFR over RPM of the selected data. Changes in cam timing that result in better breathing (or VE) will make AFR leaner because more air enters. Your goal is to make AFR as lean as possible in as many RPM ranges as possible, but especially in the area you are interested in, depending on your goal. With a MAF based system you log MAF voltage or inj. duty cycle instead of AFR.

Once you are done with that, don't touch cam timing again for further tuning. After that you get your AFR into a more reasonable range.

Until next time... Keep On Tuning!